Olympic fever & the brand police

Olympics 2012: 100 Years of Sponsorship
The sponsorship of the games and surrounding controversies has been with us for over 100 years. Oxo was one of the first official sponsors of the London Olympics in 1908, providing beef stock drinks and rice pudding for marathon runners – the food of champions. During the 60s one of the main sources of revenue for the games came from tobacco sponsorship, the ‘Olympia’ cigarette brand generating over US$1m during the 1964 Tokyo games. Who are the brand winners today?

EDF and the dawn of the twitter Olympics
London 2012 will be most digitally connected Olympics and for brand sponsors to maximise their impact, they need a strong social media presence. Sponsor EDF energy stands out with their plans for curating a light show, projected onto the London Eye. Every night a special algorithm will measure the mood of tweets surrounding the Olympics, and the colours of the light show will change to suit the mood of the public. The live show will be streamed online.

Cadbury’s ‘Chocolatarium’
CadburyHouse
Sponsorship is most effective when there is a consistent brand story and POV. After months of build-up Cadbury’s may have found its feet with the launch of the Cadbury’s house – an experiential hub where people can play with a variety of virtual sporting events and share their fun on social networks with RFID technology. The spots and stripes campaign almost feel like a distant memory.

Sponsor Confusion
There has been a lot of talk about the “Olympics Brand Police” stopping smaller businesses from mentioning the event, but just how successful has Olympic sponsorship been for the brands? This NewsWorks report looks into interest in the Olympics and how the brands awareness and perception have changed, if at all. Is Adidas’ sponsorship that successful if many people still just assume it’s Nike? Or have EDF benefited when people are still getting them confused with E.on?

Oddbins spearheading the revolt against LOCOG

The most effective marketing doesn’t need huge budgets, just a core insight into the mood of your audience. During the Olympic period Oddbins are offering anybody 30% off in -store if they turn up wearing Nike trainers and have in their pockets an RBS Mastercard, set of Vauxhall car keys and an iPhone. “We are doing this primarily to highlight the absurdity of the fact that the British people – who are paying for these games – are at the same time being subject to ridiculous rules”. Oddbins website has seen a 22% increase in traffic since its anti-olympics campaign launched

Celebrating the Paralympic athletes

This trailer from Channel 4 is one of the best ads we’ve seen from the games, celebrating the athletes as super humans whom have triumphed over adversity without being patronising. Emotive content at it’s best.

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